The Life Energy Experiment – One Year On

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A little over a year ago, I conducted a simple experiment. The essence of it was simple and you can read my rules here.

The Life Energy Experiment

The experiment invites you to consider how much ‘life energy’ (or time in paid work) you have to devote to pay for something you want to buy?

As Henry David Thoreau put it, “The cost of a thing is the amount of one’s life which is required to be exchanged for it, immediately or in the long term.”

As a rule of thumb, I used my gross hourly rate, but if you were going to be 100% accurate, you’d use your net hourly rate (less the cost of getting to work and other work-related costs such as clothing). That really focuses the mind.

Some examples

Imagine your gross hourly rate is £10 per hour (for easy maths) and you work a standard 7.5 hour day. I know that’s a simple way to view this, but let’s take it as an example. You can work out your own figures.

See how much of your life you’d have to devote to earning the money needed just to buy the following things:

  • Take-out pizza from Domino’s – £9.99 = 1 hour of your working day and just moments to consume!
  • New (full-price) coat from Zara – £99.99 = 10 hours of effort (so more than the average working day)
  • Your family’s weekly shop from mid-range supermarket – £120 = 12 hours of paid work (or 1.6 days’ effort)
  • A tank of fuel for a small car – £39.50 = 4 hours of work or half a day in the office! I know that I could get a monthly pass for the bus for just £5 more….

What about things you don’t really need?

Once you’ve started viewing your expenditure through the lens of the Life Energy Experiment, you might hesitate a little as your finger lingers over the ‘Buy it Now’ button.

You might look for ways to achieve the same goals (or to get what you’d like) in other ways:

  • Buying second-hand
  • Borrowing
  • Finding a substitute

Think about the Life Energy Experiment

So, think about the Life Energy Experiment as you go about your Christmas shopping this year.

For me, it’s definitely changed the way I view how I shop and what I choose to buy. And, as Amy from More Time Than Money says, there are times when you look at something and can simply proclaim, “This can stay money!”


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10 Ideas for a Clutter-busting Christmas

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I have previously written about gifting with grace and love, but I’ve been thinking lately about ways to achieve a clutter-less Christmas.

If you’re a minimalist yourself, you may want to be intentional in your gift giving and emphasize ‘experiences over stuff’. Perhaps you’re hoping that any gift you might receive would support your clutter-free goals. Or maybe you’re just looking for some ideas that won’t involve going to ‘shiny spending places’, which would almost certainly result in both you and your wallet feeling depleted.

Here are my 10 Ideas for a Clutter-busting Christmas

1. Try home-made

I’m baking iced Christmas tree decorations this year. Made with love, these little tokens are inexpensive to make, are low-impact when it comes to packaging, and I can be generous in gifting as many as I like. If you don’t want to hang yours on the tree, that’s fine. You can simply eat it.

Pictured above are my cookie jars from a couple of years ago. Again, these are simple to do, visually appealing and require no gift wrap. Let me know if you want the recipe!

2. Go uniform

If you can give the same little love token to lots of people, your gift wrap (if needed) can be uniform too. Try brown paper or newspaper tied with ribbon or string. This is less wasteful than buying myriad gift bags or multiple packs or rolls of gift wrap.

3. Embrace digital

I have an annual subscription with jacquielawson.com. This UK based company designs online greetings cards that can be personalised, so you can write an individual message to the recipient. Send as many as you like, save yourself a small fortune at the post office, reduce waste and avoid clutter. I know that some people still like to send physical cards, but if you lead a busy life and want an efficient way to send a meaningful message, this is one option.

4.  Buy experiences

A trip out to a venue such as the cinema or theatre isn’t a cheap night out. So, gifting an experience that will appeal to loved ones is a fabulous clutter-free option. Alternatively, buy them a music, sporting, driving or dance lesson. There’s no clutter involved and you’ll also be gifting a sense of anticipation, as they’ll have something to look forward to once the festivities are over.

5. Adopt a less is more approach

When it comes to decorations, more is not always better. You can achieve a sense of ‘hygge’ (cosyness) just as well by displaying only your very favourite items. A little bit of sparkle is lovely but you don’t need your home to look like an outpost of John Lewis. Equally, if you bring down from the loft decorations that you never use, it’s OK to let them go. Don’t be hard on yourself if you really don’t value Auntie Mabel’s Christmas baubles. You really don’t have to keep them.

6. Be of service

Have you a skill – or maybe some time – you could offer to others? If ‘acts of service’ form a part of your love language, why not offer a massage, a night’s babysitting, an afternoon’s gardening or something home-cooked? When my pal, Michelle, was 50, she asked for a home-cooked meal for her birthday. I was delighted to offer this unusual present; she and her family were pleased to eat it!

7.  Contribute to others

There are some ways to mark the festive season that will add value in ways that can really make a difference to others’ lives. Once again this year, a colleague of mine is coordinating a collection of gifts for looked after children. Local charities such as Helping Hands also distribute hampers across the community to families who will benefit most. Maybe this provides the opportunity to re-gift things you never used, but which someone else might appreciate?

8. Consider a subscription as a gift

Buying someone a subscription is a lovely treat. Perhaps a year’s membership of a group such as the WI, a magazine or music streaming subscription would be appreciated. What about a subscription box of delicious consumables? There are all kinds of subscription boxes available; why not check them out?

9. Consumables are king

This brings to my favourite gift category: consumables. Gifting something you can eat, drink, spray, apply, cook with or (better still) share is a lovely way to celebrate the holidays in a way that means the recipient won’t end up with something that will ultimately end up in the charity shop or – worse – the bin.

10. Ask them what they want

This might seem obvious, but if you’re unsure about what to give someone you love, why not ask them? Knowing you’re buying something that’s genuinely wanted or needed will guarantee they receive something they’ll truly appreciate. And don’t forget, kids love to have their own spending power, so cash (whilst not very imaginative) is often very much appreciated.

So that’s my list, but what about you? Do you have some clutter-busting holiday ideas? If so, please do share by replying below!


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Sustainable shopping: eco-wrap from the honey bee

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Abeego’s beeswax wrap

Since launching the blog, I’ve written on a variety of topics from decluttering to simple living, intentionality, frugal living, the slow home and more.

My passion for minimalism has sparked a number of new but related interests. For example:

  • How can we live in a more sustainable way?
  • Can I be more ethical as a consumer?
  • How can we eat simply but well?

Sustainable Shopping

Having consulted members of the Midlands Minimalist community, it’s clear that some of you agree. So, in the coming months, I’m going to expand into some topics that relate to these themes, one of which will be ‘Sustainable Shopping’.

This first ‘Sustainable Shopping’ post focuses on a new-to-me product, Abeego’s reusable beeswax food wrap.

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Food wrap redesigned

In our house, most of our cooking is from scratch so we often enjoy leftovers the next day. As a result, anything we don’t eat straight away may remain in its cooking pot or dish, but sometimes I want to decant a single serving into a smaller container. Here’s where years of conditioning have us unintentionally reaching for the cling film. But there is a better way.

Abeego’s beeswax food wrap offers a genuine alternative to the ‘use-it-once’ plastic film to which we are all accustomed.

My pack came from Ethical Superstore whose service was quick and efficient. However, there is a large ‘but’ coming…..

Wrap within wrapping x 4

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The Abeego wrap comes in its own cardboard packaging, which provides useful information about the product and its various benefits, as well as offering tips on how to get the best out of this washable, malleable beeswax wrap.

So far, so good.

But I found Ethical Superstore’s excessive packaging (2 layers of bubble wrap and an outer layer of grey plastic) really disappointing. How cushioned does a cardboard pack of beeswax wraps need to be?

The proof was in the wrapping

I was dubious as to how effective this product would be, but what a revelation! Just as Abeego promises, the wrap is a little tacky to the touch and malleable so you can push the wrap into the shape you want (as I did in the photo at the top of this post). Once in the fridge, the wrap stiffens, keeping itself firmly in place.

To keep it clean, a quick wash with cold water is all you need.

The MidsMins thumbs up 

So, I recommend Abeego to you. I’d estimate that – over the course of this product’s ‘lifecycle’, it may not actually save you any money, but it’s one less item going into landfill. For me, that’s reason enough to invest.


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