Discovering daily ‘pockets of freedom’ to enjoy what you love 

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Some timely prompts this week reminded me how lovely it can be to carve out a minuscule moment during the day to refresh and recharge the batteries.

Even full-time workers (with a commute) can benefit from a few, short simplicity hacks to help smooth the rough edges of an otherwise busy day.

So, what can we do?

Reframe your commute

A recent Harvard Business Review article* (from where the phrase ‘pockets of freedom’ comes) states that the average round trip commute in the U.K. takes 54 minutes. In the US, the figure is even higher at 90 minutes. That’s a significant proportion of the day!

The authors suggest that using the time to shift our mindset can be hugely beneficial, citing the use of daily pre-work rituals to help set our intention for the day ahead and create a sense of anticipation. For example, they suggest that checking the news on the train or taking a look at the calendar for the day helps us transition from home to work.

My place of work is a university, so arriving on campus is like witnessing a small town waking from its slumbers. I enjoy seeing the day unfold, as every day usually brings something new or interesting.

My colleague, Cheryl, comes to work on the bus, using the time to read or catch up with her favourite podcasts. This commute-enhancing activity allows for this little ‘pocket of freedom’ every day.

If I’m doing the school run, I drive, but I also cycle to work when I can. Whichever mode of transport I have chosen, the arrival ritual is always the same:

  • Lunch in the fridge
  • Water from the water fountain
  • Kettle on
  • Computer on

…And breathe

Build pockets of freedom into your day

Writer and friend, Rae Ritchie, has a brilliant strategy for finding more time for her preferred ‘pocket of freedom’, reading. Rae advocates arriving a little early for an appointment so that you can enjoy some delicious moments to yourself with your latest book.

If walking to a meeting across campus, I now try to build in just a few moments to spare so that, a) I don’t arrive in a flap and, b) I might just read an extra page of my book when I get there. It’s an approach also suggested by Gretchen Rubin and Liz Craft on Happier.

Don’t forget lunch times

The French may traditionally take a 2 hour ‘dejeuner’ but I wonder if they ever sing at lunch time? Every Tuesday in term-time, at precisely 13:10, the University music centre runs Fun Choir. No preparation. No fuss. Just turn up and sing! Genius!

Workplace choirs, popularised by Choirmaster Gareth Malone are becoming increasingly commonplace. In researching this article, I realised there’s even a workplace choir organisation based close to where I work.

Eating lunch with a friend offers another lovely ‘pocket of freedom’; we get away from our desks when we can and enjoy around 45 minutes of uninterrupted catch-up time. That’s really valuable and so much better than grabbing a sandwich at your desk and carrying on with work.

Enjoy a moment of mindfulness

Sometimes, you have no choice but to sit and wait. If the ‘sitting and waiting venue’ offers you a window on the world, put down that smart phone. Step away from your tablet. Simply watch the world go by. See this not as lazing about but, rather, a chance to be more mindful and to develop your awareness.

Take your dog to work

Almost every day is an ‘International Day of X’.  Friday was no exception. 23 June 2017 was ‘Bring your Dog to Work Day’. The photos on Twitter of owners and dogs enjoying each other’s company was heartwarming and fun. My workplace takes this a step further, as it brings a team of Pets as Therapy dogs to the library on a regular basis to support students’ wellbeing. This is such a popular activity and is a real highlight in the calendar when revision is otherwise the order of the day.

Unwind at home time

My boss and I often take the 10-minute walk back to the car park together. This ‘unwind ritual’ is our tacit signal that it’s time to transition from work to home. We can reflect on the day whilst drawing a metaphorical line under the proceedings of the last few hours.

Others go to the gym directly from work. This is a great way to de-stress and to transition into evening. Taking some gentle exercise immediately after work is a great antidote to a heavy work schedule. I go to yoga at 6 p.m. every Thursday. I worried initially that I might not make it in time, but the traffic has only got the better of me once or twice.

Early to bed

Finally, go to bed early and you’ll not only get a better night’s sleep but you may be able to enjoy a few more pages of your book before lights out!

Reap the benefits

By incorporating just one or two of these mini stress-busters into your day, you’ll reap far more benefit than the small amount of time they take might suggest.

So, as another week rolls around, what will you do to enjoy a little ‘pocket of freedom’? What positive ritual or simplicity hack can you build into your day to help recharge your batteries? I’d love to know!

*Harvard Business Review, May-June 2017: Reclaim Your Commute – Getting to and from work doesn’t have to be soul crushing by Francesca Gino et al.


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